6 Ways to Create a Marketing ‘Sound Bite’ for Your Local Business

6 Ways to Create a marketing Sound Bite for your Local BusinessWe are all bombarded with marketing and advertising messages daily that aim to shape our opinion, elicit action — or both. Technology makes the onslaught constant. But it also makes it all the more difficult to break through.

No matter what marketing channels you choose – print, digital, mobile, social – you must make your message as powerful as possible, and bring everyone at your business on board. That includes your employees, who should know how to communicate your basic messages with as much clarity and passion as you do.

So how can you create and deliver a powerful marketing message? The key test is this: If someone can easily recall and repeat your message, you did a great job of crafting and conveying it. To achieve this, develop several clear (and repeatable) “sound bites” and weave them into your communications.

Here are six tips for creating your marketing sound bites:

Look for a repeatable phrase

You should be able to say your message in a small, repeatable phrase that can become the slogan for promoting your product, idea or business.

Hone all messages

Edit, revise and fine-tune your messages to make them focused and punchy. Picture each person you speak to as a little radio tower empowered to broadcast your key concepts,says Nancy Duarte, CEO of a California firm that helps brands and businesses create effective messages. “Some average-looking people have 50,000 followers in their social networks,” says Duarte. “When one sound bite is sent to their followers, it can get resent hundreds of thousands of times.”

Be consistent and coordinate your messages

For maximum impact, repeat your critical messages verbatim whenever you can in the marketing materials, on your website, in your emails and on your social media pages. “Doing so ensures that people will pick up the right sound bites,” says Duarte.

Use catchy words

Take time to carefully craft a few messages with catchy words. “For example, Neil Armstrong used the 6 hours and 40 minutes between his moon landing and first step to craft his historic statement,” says Duarte. Memorable messages don’t often happen by accident. Most are planned.

Mimic a famous phrase

For example, everyone knows the Golden Rule. An imitation of that famous phrase might be: “Never give a presentation you wouldn’t want to sit through yourself.”

Ask and listen

When you’re talking with your customers, ask them how they would describe your business to their friends and colleagues. Their answers could give you the sound bite you’re looking for – or steer you in a direction you weren’t thinking about.

Remember: It takes effort to make an idea spring to life with words and images. That means spending some time to understand the customers and carefully craft your message. You should spend the time ensuring that the message behind those ideas gets heard. The last thing you want is for your message to be considered “just noise.”

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